How Are You Using Your Time?

“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.
“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

I’m not as productive as I’d like to be. Who is?

I spend a good amount of time reading.

And I’ve been writing. Drawing. Painting.

I go for the occasional walk.

Pretty productive.

I’ve also spent quite a bit of time with my boys. That’s always good.

Not all my time is spent so wisely, though.

I spend hours sitting and thinking.

Spending too much time in the past.

It’s good to learn from the past.

But not to live there.

I need to get out and do more.

“Only Say Positive Things”?

I knew it was extreme. I set an extreme goal on purpose.

I’m not trying to set a realistic goal. I’m trying to stretch myself.

Explaining my present situation may help.

I’m usually alone in the mornings. I write, do my mirror work, listen to uplifting music, read uplifting books, list things I’m happy about/grateful for, etc.

It’s easy to be positive during those times.

Most days I see my boys. This is one of the things I’m most grateful for.

They and their mother live with their grandparents.

These are not positive people. Not by a long shot. These are angry, bitter people, who have no interest in improving themselves.

By the time I leave I’ve been taken down a few notches. It’s worth it to spend time with my boys. I love seeing them, and they love seeing me. I hope my efforts are helping them.

I’m looking forward to meeting super positive people. People who will be a bigger influence on me than the negative people in my life.

Until then, I do what I can.

Be Weird

Weird Guy“Easy for you to say, Phil. You’re already weird.”

So are you. Being a Latter-day Saint is weird. We are a peculiar people.

Accept it.

Embrace it.

What do you care what other people think?

Richard Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics, 1965

Too many of us do what everyone else does, without thinking about whether that’s the best option for us.

Here in the Western world, a typical person’s life goes like this:

  • Preschool
  • School
  • College
  • Work at a boring/stressful job
  • Retire for a little bit
  • Death

For Latter-day Saint men there’s usually a mission or two in there somewhere, but the rest is the same.

We’ve been conditioned to believe this is how life goes. We figure we’ll enjoy life later. When we retire.

Most people die not long after retiring.

I spent twenty years doing things just to make money. After that I decided to try to find a better way.

I’m finally figuring out how to support myself and my kids doing things I love.

And it doesn’t involve getting a J.O.B. Just Over Broke. Building someone else’s dream. Working forty hours a week. Having someone else dictate my schedule. Barely having any time and energy left to do what I want.

Getting a job is one of many things our society tells us is “normal.”

Our society is sick, and getting sicker.

Don’t listen to them.

It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

Jiddu Krishnamurti

Heavenly Father didn’t give you a unique set of talents and abilities so you could be like everyone else. Stop suppressing the things that make you unique.

Try stuff out. Try as many different things as you can (as long as it’s not something immoral). See what you like. Pursue that.

Improve. Learn more, even though you’ve left school. Keep pushing. Don’t over stress yourself, but keep growing.

Be what James Altucher calls “The Criminal of Their Rules.”

Be willing to be ridiculed.

Be willing to be thought a fool.

Be a non-conformist.

Be willing to live by inspiration and revelation.

Be weird.

The Pursuit of Money

Chasing a winged dollar

In high school I had to take a “Careers” class. I only remember two things from that class:

  • We watched a video on sexual harassment one day. The video warned about giving “meaningful looks.” What the heck are “meaningful looks?” I was a teenage boy. And now I was terrified of being sued for looking at the girls around me.
  • Another day we took an aptitude test. My results said I should be an artist. No way. I couldn’t make money as an artist. I enjoyed writing and drawing, but I didn’t think I could support a family doing those things.

I went to college to be an engineer. That didn’t last long. Before long I was just taking the classes that sounded fun. I only went when I felt like it. My grades suffered.

I got a letter from the college. They told me to take a term off to think about my life. Then I could ask to come back.

I wasn’t going to beg to come back. Forget that!

I got a call center job. I hated it, but the money was okay. I spent the next few years bouncing from one call center job to another.

Five years later I went back to school to learn Japanese. I decided to take some other fun classes while I was at it. After a year I started getting more serious. It didn’t take long to burn out after that.

Years later I was out of work. By then I’d gotten married. I had a son. I applied at the call centers I’d worked at before. They never got back to me. I didn’t have any other experience.

My wife said I should go back to school. I’d been wanting to for a while. I majored in Computer Science. I was excited at first, but my heart wasn’t in it for long.

My grades went downhill. My adviser told me I’d have to change majors.

I left school instead. I applied to an online university. They wanted me to get a computer certification before enrolling.

I started studying for the certification tests. I couldn’t focus. I was so bored.

I went to college for six-and-a-half years. I have zero degrees. There were some fun and interesting parts, but mostly it was a waste of my time. And not just because I didn’t get that parchment.

I worked in call centers for a few more years. My last job laid me off. A few months later I was separated and living in my mom’s basement.

I’ve spent twenty years pursuing things I thought would make me money, and making myself miserable. I’d say it was a waste, but at least I’ve learned something from it:

DON’T WORK JUST FOR MONEY.